Teach-In on Racism & White Supremacy

We have joined hundreds of other Unitarian Universalist congregations to participate in a series of introspective worship services and teach-ins addressing racism and white supremacy not only in the wider culture but in our own denomination and congregations. The following introduction comes from worship service on April 30, 2017, “Everyone Starts Somewhere.”


Introduction

This is a sensitive and challenging topic. We will be respectful and kind as we explore it. We begin with a definition from Unitarian Universalist leaders of color:

Why ‘white supremacy’ as the term here? It conjures up images of hoods and mobs. Here, we mean: ‘White supremacy as a set of institutional assumptions and practices, often operating unconsciously, that tend to beneft white people and exclude people of color.’ In 2017, actual ‘white supremacists’ are not required in order to uphold white supremacist culture. Building a faith full of people who understand that key distinction is essential as we work toward a more just society in difficult political times.” – Black Lives of Unitarian-Universalism

The term White Supremacy is a difficult phrase. An ugly phrase. And a painful phrase. No reasonable person in this century would ever want to be remotely touched by this phrase. Yet, not only is the phrase still in existence, that the need for the phrase has gone away. But White Supremacy is more than a phrase that defines a evil vision and a discredited motivation. It is also a phrase that can do untold damage if not examined intentionally, regardless of one’s vision or motivation. Until we can be sure that we have rooted out unconscious racism and white supremacy, we cannot let our efforts ease. We are called to courage as we examine this need.

Resource List

Click the link above to download a list of print, video, and online resources compiled by our Ministerial Team and our Racial Justice Task Force.

Read the full version of Peggy McIntosh’s essay, “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack,” from which we took our the reflection questions used in our worship service titled “Take Courage” held on October 29, 2017.

 Everyone Starts Somewhere

Click the link above to read the sermons and words for reflection shared in our worship service on April 30, 2017.

Get connected to our Racial Justice Task Force to learn about upcoming events in the community and within our congregation. From confronting your own implicit biases to attending our monthly Racial Justice Film Series or showing up at community actions and rallies, there are many ways you can contribute to the work to dismantle white supremacy and build our Beloved Community. Look for our events online or contact Erica Stetson, Co-Chair of the Racial Justice Task Force, to find out how you can get involved.